Our quantifiable future: the industry’s hunger for data (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 40)

Data acquisition processing is changing the world and the impact will be felt on larger scales than industrial contexts alone. IoT and IIoT technologies are gathering data points on many human and machine related activities, quantifying the world more precisely and pervasively than ever before. At this point in time, there are a few questions that can help us define the future of these processes: what are the next steps forward in this hunger for data? Do we have a functioning framework from which to extrapolate insights in a secure fashion? What will happen when technology allows us to make *anything* quantifiable? New partnerships are making data acquisition ubiquitous in the AM industry. This data will be used in quality assessments to improve part production and pipeline efficiency. Security is still paramount and new businesses and research projects are ready to prove that we have the technology to make safe and efficient data processing a reality. Businesses need to protect themselves against cyberattacks now more than ever. GPS technology is not anymore up to the standards required in the industry and everyday applications. Company Humantics is promising a microlocation-based future, which applied to AI and machine learning algorithms can enable new, high-granularity controls and services.

Oak Ridge Partners With Senvol For 3D Printing Data Collection Project

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry views the 3D printed proof-of-concept hull for the Optionally Manned Technology Demonstrator (OMTD). (Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Department of Energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), co-developer of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and one of America’s leading technological research institutes, has signed a two-year research agreement with the Senvol additive manufacturing database. In the collaboration, ORNL will use Senvol’s Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) to evaluate the best processes for data collection and apply it to quality assessment of 3D printer feedstock materials.

Read more here.

Three-Layer Technique Helps Secure Additive Manufacturing

[…] AM could become a target for malicious attacks – as well as for unscrupulous operators who may cut corners. Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Rutgers University have developed a three-layer system to verify that components produced using AM have not been compromised. Their system uses acoustic and other physical techniques to confirm that the printer is operating as expected, and nondestructive inspection techniques to verify the correct location of tiny gold nanorods buried in the parts. The validation technique is independent of printer firmware and software in the controlling computer.

Read more about the system at RDMag.

Introducing Humatics: Revolutionizing How People and Machines Locate, Navigate and Collaborate

Imagine a tool that will only drill a hole at the exact right spot, a large format robotic 3D printer with unprecedented precision, a drone that hovers precisely indoors, and augmented reality glasses that project ultra-precise images onto the world you see. Now imagine AI and machine learning applied to every conductor, every factory worker, every robotic collaboration: technology placing our work within a broad human context. That’s where Humatics is going.

Take a look at Humantics at their website.

If you wish to be kept updated on a daily basis on movements in the AM/IIoT world check out Twitter feed!

Security & Systematic issues in wake of IIoT (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 12)

Hello to our dear readers, welcome to the latest edition of News-In-Review!

IIoT is a term dense of meanings and implications. A lot of businesses see in its wake the possibility of unprecedented ROIs and some are already putting down the foundations to implement it in their proceedings. However, before obtaining the many benefits of data analytics, the proper system has to be put in place. One that needs to improve upon a pre-existing industrial network, fixing it’s outdated vulnerabilities, without the need for a complete overhaul. One that is able to withstand a growing risk of DDOS attacks from a growing number of sources thanks to the sensors riddled world we are constructing. And lastly, but not least, one that can assure quality processes and control of every step of the process chain.

If this is a topic you’re interested in, and want to dig in further, our CEO and CTO have written a chapter for Springer’s new “Cyberphysical Security for Industry 4.0” – due May 10.

Here’s this week news:

Forgotten factors that could take down IIoT

When it comes to IoT adoption in the industrial space, I’ve often found that operators worry about how they’re going to run before they can even walk. What this means is industrial operators let certain barriers to entry — primarily security and availability — keep them from even starting on their path to IIoT. In reality, there are certain key steps that industrial companies need to take well before they even attempt that transition.

Read more about these steps here.

Security Professionals Expect More Attacks On IIoT in 2017

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 12.28.16 AM

As technology vendors race to create more and more devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT) the opportunity for hackers to get into these devices grows larger and larger, as these IoT devices are usually made with little to no regard for security. The fears of a large-scale attack waiting to happen were solidified this week when security firm Tripwire released the results of a study it performed about the rise of industrial IoT deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.

Read the article and study at Onthewire.

Control is the key factor for implementing additive manufacturing in industry

According to the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), control is the key factor for the implementation of additive manufacturing in an industrial setting. Speaking at today’s Additive World conference […] the MTC’s David Wimpenny explains the most important obstacles additive manufacturing needs to address. They created the National Centre for Additive Manufacturing two years ago, as a visualization of how they expect an additive manufacturing ‘factory of the future’ would look. However, Wimpenny is keen to stress it is not about the number of parts produced in the factory, but about control of the processes. Control of the quality and control of the data is the most important consideration for Wimpenny. As he says, “In a process chain, whatever you don’t control will be a problem”.

Read more here.

 

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back in a week time to get a new glimpse at the future of AM, IIoT and all things in between!