Monitoring 3D prints – more than just a business boost (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 94)

We at Authentise are champions of the idea that 3D printing data must be exploited anywhere it is to be found. This often times comes from the printers themselves, offering KPIs on successful print rates and more. Yet even more information can come from external monitoring systems, which that can provide you with data from within the process itself. The benefits of running a monitoring system are numerous, from helping you identify, and potentially correct, issues from within the process, to giving an unprecedented look at still little-known physical phenomenons. Metal printing, for example, is still grounds of research, as we try to understand the dynamics of precise powder melting and the behavior of very hot particles. Another example would be to track 3D printed objects, based on the unique printing “signature” of each printer (like vibrational micro-defects), and thus being able to tell which printer produced it.

High-Speed Cameras Used to Monitor 3D Printing Process

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In a thesis entitled “Process Monitoring for Temporal-Spatial Modeling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion,” a student named Animek Shaurya studies the use of high-speed video cameras for in-situ monitoring of the 3D printing process of nickel alloy 625 to detect meltpool, splatter, and over melting regions to improve the quality of the print.

Read more at 3DPrint.com

New NIST method measures 3D polymer processing precisely

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Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a novel light-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique–sample-coupled-resonance photorheology (SCRPR)–that measures how and where a material’s properties change in real time at the smallest scales during the curing process. […] Surprising the researchers, interest in the NIST technique has extended well beyond the initial 3D printing applications. Companies in the coatings, optics and additive manufacturing fields have reached out, and some are pursuing formal collaborations, NIST researchers say.

Read the rest here.

This is how researchers can now track 3D printed guns, weapons

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According to academics from the University of Buffalo, there is a way to use the ‘fingerprint’ of 3D printers to accurately trace items printed through the machinery, which may include counterfeit goods, guns, and other weaponry.  No in-fill patterns are the same, and this is the key to tracking down a specific printer.

“3D printers are built to be the same. But there are slight variations in their hardware created during the manufacturing process that leads to unique, inevitable and unchangeable patterns in every object they print,” says Wenyao Xu, Ph.D., associate professor of computer science and engineering in UB’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and lead author of the study.

Read the full article here.

 

Senvol Developing Machine Learning for US Navy for Additive Manufacturing

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Senvol has publicly announced that it is developing data-driven machine learning AM software for the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR). Senvol’s software analyzes the relationships between AM process parameters and material performance. ONR’s goal is to use Senvol’s software to assist in developing statistically substantiated material properties in hopes of reducing conventional material characterization and testing that is needed to develop design allowables.

Read more here.

 

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Our quantifiable future: the industry’s hunger for data (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 40)

Data acquisition processing is changing the world and the impact will be felt on larger scales than industrial contexts alone. IoT and IIoT technologies are gathering data points on many human and machine related activities, quantifying the world more precisely and pervasively than ever before. At this point in time, there are a few questions that can help us define the future of these processes: what are the next steps forward in this hunger for data? Do we have a functioning framework from which to extrapolate insights in a secure fashion? What will happen when technology allows us to make *anything* quantifiable? New partnerships are making data acquisition ubiquitous in the AM industry. This data will be used in quality assessments to improve part production and pipeline efficiency. Security is still paramount and new businesses and research projects are ready to prove that we have the technology to make safe and efficient data processing a reality. Businesses need to protect themselves against cyberattacks now more than ever. GPS technology is not anymore up to the standards required in the industry and everyday applications. Company Humantics is promising a microlocation-based future, which applied to AI and machine learning algorithms can enable new, high-granularity controls and services.

Oak Ridge Partners With Senvol For 3D Printing Data Collection Project

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry views the 3D printed proof-of-concept hull for the Optionally Manned Technology Demonstrator (OMTD). (Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Department of Energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), co-developer of the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and one of America’s leading technological research institutes, has signed a two-year research agreement with the Senvol additive manufacturing database. In the collaboration, ORNL will use Senvol’s Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) to evaluate the best processes for data collection and apply it to quality assessment of 3D printer feedstock materials.

Read more here.

Three-Layer Technique Helps Secure Additive Manufacturing

[…] AM could become a target for malicious attacks – as well as for unscrupulous operators who may cut corners. Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Rutgers University have developed a three-layer system to verify that components produced using AM have not been compromised. Their system uses acoustic and other physical techniques to confirm that the printer is operating as expected, and nondestructive inspection techniques to verify the correct location of tiny gold nanorods buried in the parts. The validation technique is independent of printer firmware and software in the controlling computer.

Read more about the system at RDMag.

Introducing Humatics: Revolutionizing How People and Machines Locate, Navigate and Collaborate

Imagine a tool that will only drill a hole at the exact right spot, a large format robotic 3D printer with unprecedented precision, a drone that hovers precisely indoors, and augmented reality glasses that project ultra-precise images onto the world you see. Now imagine AI and machine learning applied to every conductor, every factory worker, every robotic collaboration: technology placing our work within a broad human context. That’s where Humatics is going.

Take a look at Humantics at their website.

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