Production AM needs Post-Processing that is up to par (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #128)

As we gear towards a more diffused and wide-ranging production AM ecosystem, maintaining a post-processing workflow that is up to it will be equally important. Most 3D printed parts aren’t usable without a post-processing step, be that supports removal, polishing or thermal tempering. We’ve gotten quite good at it, and creative, designing machinery that is simple yet performant, to aid in the quest for a tight-knit AM pipeline. Software plays an equally important role. Authentise has recently announced our app to enable AM operators to digitize post-processing steps, enriching their workflow with data from the entire process.

Postprocessing gains importance as the number of parts in 3D-printed production runs increases

“There’s a real shift in the industry right now,” said Ed Graham, vice president of additive manufacturing at ProtoCAM. “Where it might be cost-effective using human labor to finish a prototype or even a couple dozen parts, we’re now seeing orders for 1,000 pieces or more. That’s why more efficient postprocessing methods are increasingly important now, because of all the emphasis recently on end-use materials, faster print times, larger build envelopes, and, ultimately, higher production volumes.”

Read the full article on The Fabricator.

Is Plasma The Missing Link In Assembling 3D Printed Parts?

Motorbike fairing glued together using piezobrush PZ2. Image via Relyon Plasma.

The [Relyon Plasma’s] piezobrush PZ2 uses plasma to activate surface particles of a substance which strengthens the adhesion between joined parts. With a strong bond between assembled 3D printed parts, it is possible to manufacture large-sized sturdy components on small sized 3D printers. According to the CEO of Creabis, Ralf Deuke, plasma-aided bonding will lead to more novel applications in 3D printing.

Read more about it at 3DPrint.com

Post-Processing Enabling Additive Manufacturing

Post processing, in one form or another, is an inevitability when using additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, but is particularly critical for serial production applications of AM — both in terms of the financial costs and the time it takes between a part leaving the AM system and being fit for purpose as an end-use product. In this article, Joseph Crabtree, the CEO at Additive Manufacturing Technologies Ltd, considers the importance of post-processing in the entire production process chain and highlights an emerging solution.

Read more here.

 

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AM for production is already here (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #119)

Production level AM seems a far cry for many in the manufacturing industry. However, we have many examples of how businesses are starting to put the technology to work on the factory floor. Leading the march is the aviation industry, with companies like Airbus 3D printing thousands of aircraft components today, shaving off weight and increasing reliability. Right up second is automotive, with companies like Bugatti and GM redesigning car parts through AM, and putting them in cars roaming the streets today. Also, the footwear industry has been keen to adopt AM as both a marketing strategy and a serious production boon. Improved customization and agility got the attention of companies like Nike, Adidas and Under Armour, creating both limited editions and mass-produced soles and shoe components.

 

Premium AEROTEC 3D Printing Serially Produced Parts For All Airbus A350 XWB Aircraft

A few years ago Airbus said that it would have over a 1000 3D printed components on each aircraft. Subsidiary Airbus Helicopters has for a few months now been serially producing metal door latch shafts for the A350. Now Premium Aerotec, itself also an Airbus subsidiary, will start serially producing metal 3D printed components for the A350 as well. These have now entered into serial production and have been delivered to Airbus.

Read the full article here.

 

Bugatti champions 3D-printed parts

The Divo supercar, with its $5.8 million starting price, was one of the stars of last summer’s Monterey Car Week. It achieved a 77-pound weight reduction from the Bugatti Chiron on which it is based, with some coming from more precisely made 3D printed taillights. Last year, it revealed that it has worked with tech suppliers Bionic Production and Fraunhofer IAPT to develop an eight-piston, titanium monobloc brake caliper via 3D printing. Bugatti says that part is being prepared for series production.

Read the rest here.

 

Five footwear industry leaders using 3D printing for production today

adidas concept shoe

Leading footwear AM companies – Adidas, Nike, Under Armour, New Balance, and Reebok – are targeting different footwear final parts and products, relying on different technologies and materials. However, there are some common trends which are based on the overall macro trend of advanced manufacturing: mass customization and digital mass production.

Read the full analysis at 3D Printing Media Network.

 

 

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