The Confluence of AI and AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 92)

We’ve witnessed how the digital age is transforming the manufacturing industry and nowhere it is more apparent than in the contributions that AI is giving to the field. Advanced computing capabilities are being coupled with full-spectrum sensors and autonomous “thinking”. These systems are being developed in AM for a variety of benefits. First, they can help with in-process fault detection, constantly monitoring the printer for defects where the human eye can’t see and even adjust it to fix the problem on the spot. Bringing a trustworthy AI system in the fray opens up possibilities for decentralized manufacturing, where human skill isn’t needed to produce good quality, reliable parts. Such manufacturing units can be located anywhere, operate autonomously and even cooperate with one another to reach a certain goal. Authentise is presently using AI technologies to drive process estimates, providing an accurate, reliable window into your operations.

 

US Navy and Lockheed Martin Are Building AI-Driven 3D Printing Robots

Lockheed Martin

A new generation of smart 3D printers is under development which will use artificial intelligence to oversee and optimize 3D printed parts. The US Navy’s Office of Naval Research (ONR), which is funding the ambitious project, has recently announced a two-year $5.8 million contract. There are four partners working on this project, led by Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Centre. The collective aim is to be able to create robots that can make independent decisions on how to optimize the production of complicated 3D printed parts.

Read the rest here.

 

Mobile Robots Cooperate to 3D Print Large Structures

A team of robot arms on mobile bases can 3D print large structures quickly

Roboticists at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have, for the first time (as far as they know), performed “the actual printing of a single-piece concrete structure by two mobile robots operating concurrently.” The big advantage of this system is that you can use it to build structures that are more or less arbitrary in size without having to change the system all that much, since the robots themselves can define their own build volume by moving around.

Read more at IEEE Spectrum.

 

Kansas State University Researchers Develop AI System For 3D Printing Process Monitoring

Researchers from Kansas State University’s Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (IMSE) have developed a new quality monitoring system for the 3D printing process. With integrated supervised machine learning, a camera, and image processing software, the researchers created a production quality monitoring system for assessing 3D printed parts in real-time.

Read the full article here.

 

We’ll be at Formnext in Frankfurt from the 13th to 16th November. Come see us at booth #B30J.

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Finding the new limits of AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 88)

If you think that AM is sitting comfortably into its allotted seat, that it has already found its target market, you’d be wrong. AM’s flexibility enables us to find numerous potential fields to disrupt. This flexibility is made possible by its assortment of technologies, hardware, software and everything in between, that change the rules year by year. Advances in robotics and AI enable groups of autonomous, mobile units to step up the construction process. After the 3D printed pills and surgical models and implants, we are now beginning to use AM in the development of new future-proof antibiotics. Strong of its success of sending the first 3D printer to the ISS, Made in Space is aiming to produce higher quality fiber optics in space, creating a new business case for manufacturing in and outside Earth’s orbit.

Mobile Robots Cooperate to 3D Print Large Structures

A team of robot arms on mobile bases can 3D print large structures quickly

Roboticists at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have, for the first time (as far as they know), performed “the actual printing of a single-piece concrete structure by two mobile robots operating concurrently.” The big advantage of this system is that you can use it to build structures that are more or less arbitrary in size without having to change the system all that much, since the robots themselves can define their own build volume by moving around.

Read more at IEEE Spectrum.

HP Partners With CDC To Test And Bioprint Antibiotics

The HP D300e Digital Dispenser BioPrinter. Photo via HP.

HP has announced its participation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) pilot program that aims to develop new antibiotics designed to fight antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. With HP’s bioprinting technology, microbiologists are able to print antibiotics samples for testing directed at halting the spread of such bacteria.

Read the full article here.

Optical fibre made in orbit should be better than the terrestrial sort

Made in Space and FOMS (Fiber Optic Manufacturing in Space) are both proposing to manufacture optical fibre of the highest quality in the free-falling conditions of the International Space Station. At $1m a kilogram, this is a material that is well worth the trip to and from orbit.

Read more on The Economist.

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AUTHENTISE will be exhibiting, through a partnership with America Makes, the power of smart digital tools within the AM production thread. Showcasing our 3Diax modular platform and MES for AM, you’ll be able to witness how our machine learning algorithms and automation tools can boost operational performance through the roof for each role within the pipeline.

WHERE: additive ETC, located on Level 3 of the West Building at McCormick Center.

Tackling Education in the World of Additive Manufacturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 63)

AM is here to stay but, for many, the technology is a valuable opportunity watched from afar. Why? A big skill-gap is plaguing the manufacturing industry, which has a hard time finding the right people to employ. How is education being updated to bring new engineers up to current standards? What is the role of industrial and public institutions in influencing education? How much knowledge can one attain with a get-dirty, DIY approach?

Countries around the globe are recognizing the impact AM is having on the manufacturing economy and, along with other advanced technologies, are redesigning curriculums to include these trends. Also, industrial conglomerates, who are the most afflicted by the skill gap issues, aren’t standing by: many are rising up to develop training centers and generate activities to turn the tide. Nonetheless, some students are taking matters into their own hands, not only applying themselves to learning but developing business ideas revolving around AM.

Singapore wants elementary schoolers learning 3D printing, robotics, more

Singapore’s Applied Learning Programme (ALP), which aims to deliver hands-on learning programs to primary schoolers, is being expanded. All schools will implement the program, which includes STEM activities like robotics, coding, and 3D printing, by the year 2023.

“Students learn by applying and by doing, and they learn beyond the classroom,” Ng explained. “They see for themselves how they can apply what they have learnt to the real world.” – Singapore’s Education Minister for Schools Ng Chee Meng

Read more about it here.

NCAM calls on industry to help plug additive manufacturing skills gap

MTC NCAM

Given the buzz around AM technologies, you would be forgiven for assuming the message has been received loud and clear but with the UK Government’s recent Industrial Strategy failing to highlight the importance of AM and around 62% of manufacturers planning to undertake some form of move to ‘Industry 4.0‘, the appeal for more education and relevant skills is extremely valid. Within the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC) in Coventry, the team at the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacture (NCAM) is currently seeking to answer that call by embarking on the task of addressing the AM skills gap.

Read more at TCT Mag.

3D Printing Entrepreneur Reveals Plan for 24h Sneaker Turnaround

A student entrepreneur who developed the idea, technology, and production of his own brand of custom 3D printed sneakers will see his “UnisBrands” products hit the market soon. Nick Unis, who is currently a final year accounting and finance student at Penn State University-Altoona, has been nurturing his idea for custom running shoes since high school. Having now joined the Happy Valley LaunchBox FastTrack Accelerator, Unis plans to ship the first UnisBrands shoes in Summer 2018, with the aim of averting 24 to 72 hours turnaround per pair.

Keep reading the article here.

 

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The importance of recognized standards in AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 61)

As of now, AM has already proven its worth as a manufacturing tool worthy of consideration in many industrial sectors. If it is to find a foothold in every major industry, guaranteeing both stellar performances and safety, standards and best practices need to be delineated. Industrial partners want to ensure the viability of AM workflows on a scalable platform: this requires a thorough understanding of all processes, materials, pipeline steps and so on. Similarly, govt. agencies want to boost its propagation by maximizing safety and reliability across the board. ISO and others have already paved the way, but new partners are now entering: Oerlikon and Boeing are one example in which industrial partners seek common operational ground. The CECIMO European body is another, promoting the adoption of manufacturing standards and AM research centers pushing the bureaucracy forward when it comes to certifications.

Boeing partners Oerlikon to speed up adoption of 3D printing

Boeing is co-operating with Swiss engineering group Oerlikon to jointly develop additive manufacturing processes in a bid to accelerate the technology’s wider employment.

“The research will initially focus on industrializing titanium powder bed fusion AM and ensuring parts made with this process meet the flight requirements of the US Federal Aviation Administration and Department of Defense,” says Oerlikon.

Read more about it here.

AM In Europe Boosted By CECIMO Partnership

Map of CECIMO nations. Image via CECIMO
Map of CECIMO nations. Image via CECIMO

CECIMO, the body behind Europe’s additive manufacturing strategy, has announced a new partnership with EPMA, the European Powder Metallurgy Association. Together, under a joint memorandum of understanding (MOU), the two organizations are aiming to promote the adoption of 3D printing throughout established manufacturing industries.

“If Europe aims to remain a leader in advanced manufacturing production, it will need to succeed in the global race to industrialize additive manufacturing” – comments Filip Geerts, Director General of CECIMO

Read the full article here.

DNV GL launches AM Centre of Excellence to define certification standards for oil & gas and offshore & marine sectors

DNV GL metal part

DNV GL, a global risk assurance and risk management company, is to establish a Global Additive Manufacturing Centre of Excellence in Singapore.

Supported by the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB), DNV GL will consider qualification and certification, as well as provide training in AM for engineers. In the O&M sector, adoption of AM has been slow because of the challenges surrounding certification, according to DNV GL. The company, thus, wants to provide the industry with technical standards and guidelines to qualify and certify AM equipment, process, products and materials.

Read more at TCT Mag.

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