Bespoke solutions to today’s problems (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #133)

3D printing gives companies access to a variety of features previously extremely hard to get or even impossible. One of the most exciting ones comes from its intrinsic manufacturing agility. 3D printing not only enables custom-made product manufacturing, it opened Pandora’s box of possibilities in bespoke solutions to our present and future challenges. Scan-based 3D printed helmets are the tip of the iceberg of where we can push this concept. Patient-specific medical implants and bioprinting are already being developed to address and further reduce rejection and failure rates. The path ahead is brimming with possibilities, of AI-driven 3D printing robots, applying their smarts to repairing failing infrastructures or even coral reefs with bespoke 3D printing solutions. This and much more will make traditional manufacturing terribly limiting and singleminded.

Custom 3D Printed HEXR Cycling Helmets Are Now Shipping To Customers

3D printed Hexo helmets. Photo via Hexo Helmet.

HEXR helmets, the custom 3D printed bicycle helmets formerly known as HEXO, has now begun shipping to customers. […] The HEXR helmet features a 3D printed honeycomb core, produced using SLS 3D printing technology and Polyamide 11 from leading industrial 3D printer manufacturer EOS. Each helmet is 3D printed according to the measurements of the user, acquired through a 3D scanning app, in order to create a lightweight and protective headgear solution catered to the customer.

Read more on 3D Printing Industry.

 

3D printing could meet rising demand for heart valves

artificial heart valves

If Swiss researchers have their way, artificial heart valves could simply come out of 3D printers in future. Switzerland’s Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ), along with South African company Straight Access Technologies (SAT) has developed a silicone replacement for the heart valves used today. However, it will take at least ten years before the custom-made artificial heart valves can be used. Experts expect that in the coming decades the demand for artificial heart valves will increase sharply in large parts of the world. This is due to aging, lack of exercise and poor nutrition. Replacement heart valves from the 3D printer could help meet this demand.

Read the full article at Swissinfo.

 

GXN proposes underwater 3D printers to repair the cracks in our planet

GXN proposes underwater 3D printers to repair the cracks in our planet

GXN innovation has unveiled research that suggests using autonomous, robotic 3D printers to fix the cracks in the infrastructure of our planet. its proposal ‘break the grid’ imagines a near future where global challenges such as damaged coral reefs and the thermal envelopes of high-rises are fixed with such devices.

‘freeing 3D printers to meet these challenges could be a revolution in the making,’ says Kasper Jensen, founder of GXN. ‘by enabling 3D printing robots to crawl, swim, and fly, we can address pressing environmental threats around the world at lower cost and with greater efficiency.’

Read more at Designboom.

 

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Governments Driving AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 10)

Hi everyone, here we go for another weekly News-In-Review!

This week we highlight, through our selected news, how AM is bringing the wind of change to countries’ industrial planning and policies and how its inclusion has driven economic growth. Through wise policy making and good support investments, countries like South Africa and England and enabling the creation of business ecosystems, both startups and well-established realities. Germany is already harvesting the fruits of long standing AM companies, with innovation driven partnerships in the automotive industry and beyond.

Here’s to more international effort to get into AM!

Let’s dig in.

UK publishes Digital Strategy outlining plans for Makerspaces, IP protection for 3D printing, and internationally connected Tech Hubs

Westminster, including London's Houses of Parliament. Photo by Ged Carroll, on Flickr as renaissancechambara

The UK Department for Culture, Media & Sport has released a Digital Strategy for economic, educational and infrastructural growth of the nation. The policy follows a seven prong plan touching on the concepts of Makerspaces, FabLabs, 3D imaging, intellectual property for 3D printing, and growing international Tech Hubs. In February 2017, London Mayor Sadiq Khan also announced plans for a hub of industry in East London. As part of a total regeneration of the area, Silvertown is expected to feature the largest 3D printing facility in the UK.

Read more here.

South Africa in talks with Airbus, Boeing to print 3D parts

An Airbus A400M military aircraft. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

Officially launched in 2011 and backed by government, the Aeroswift research project last year produced its first three demonstrator parts – a pilot’s throttle lever, a condition lever grip which is part of the throttle assembly, and a fuel tank pylon bracket, in a digital process known as 3D printing, or additive layer manufacturing. […] South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in partnership with local aerospace firm Aerosud Innovation Centre, say access to vast titanium reserves as well as pioneering the world’s largest titanium powder-based 3D printing machine should give them a competitive edge.

Read the full article here.

Five Stories Indicating Auto 3D Printing Is Kicking into High Gear

A 3D-printed water pump wheel for use in a DTM racecar. (Image courtesy of the BMW Group.)

Although there are numerous stories regarding the use of additive manufacturing (AM) in aerospace, due to the specialty components needed for critical applications, AM is also becoming increasingly prevalent for end part production in auto manufacturing. Below are just five of the big automotive AM stories that demonstrate its potential for auto manufacturing.

Read about the five stories at Engineering.com

 

AERODEF 2017:  We have a session titled ‘Additive Manufacturing from Lab to Production Scale‘ on Thursday 3/9 at 10 am, room 102 at Aerodef. Come see us, we’d love to meet you!

This is it for this week, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and come back next week for the upcoming edition.