Digitizing the manufacturing infrastructure (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 100)

At Authentise, we are advocates of the idea that data is the new driving force of every industry. Through it, we are finding new ways to address our current limitations and replacing the physical with the digital. Flexibility is the keyword here. Technologies like AM enable us to do away with traditional warehouses and produce spare parts on-demand. This enables companies to save a great deal on maintenance costs, inventory upkeep, and material/production waste. CAD data can be stored throughout the product’s history and replacement parts can be printed even after the product has run its course. Digitizing the pipeline offers the chance to reinvent parts’ designs based on new generative optimizations. These are in turn based off of FEM analysis, which can improve the part’s performance while reducing its weight greatly. A few concerns are still being thought through: IP protection, part qualification and more, but its promise is already being realized.

Digital Inventory: How 3D Printing Lets Manufacturers Rely Less On Warehouses Of Stuff

Digital inventory” is a concept increasingly bandied about in supply chain management. More than a buzzword, the underlying principle is that rather than stock a physical warehouse with mass quantities of spare parts that may or may not be in demand at any given time, including parts for now-obsolete original products, design files for components can be stored digitally and made on demand.

Read the full article here.

FIT AG presents ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ additive manufacturing solution at Formnext

SPOD FIT AG

FIT AG has presented its ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ (SPOD) solution at Formnext which employs additive manufacturing to produce industrial replacement components. It has come about as companies continue to work towards implementing digital inventories which lean on additive manufacturing rather than storing parts is warehouses that have been produced by conventional means. The reason being to save on cost and time.

Read more here.

The Designer Changing The Way Aircraft Are Built

The use of massive computing power to conjure radical new designs automatically – a process known as generative design – is revolutionising the way human designers work, letting us build things we previously couldn’t have imagined. Instead of waiting for inspiration to hit, computers go looking. Handed a set of design constraints – such as making it lightweight, strong and low-cost – generative design software identifies and assesses hundreds or thousands of candidates that all fit the bill, before selecting the pick of the crop.

Read more here.

 

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Formnext showed us how the AM industry is maturing (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 98)

The Authentise team has been exhibiting at Formnext in Frankfurt this past week. We had a blast exchanging views on the AM world and better understanding the industry as a whole. In the times between meetings and booth chats, we had the chance to roam the halls and take a peek at what’s on the horizon. What’s been consistently shown is a maturity and wide-ranging offering of products and services. The AM industry is cementing its stance, partly thanks to proven applications and no lack of R&D investment. As we saw it, Formnext was a chance for progress, not groundbreaking. This is not to say that there wasn’t innovation to be found within its halls, on the contrary. But the players are now pushing for market permeation more than ever.

EOS TO PREMIERE MILLION-LASER POLYMER 3D PRINTING AT FORMNEXT 2018

Powder exposure on the LaserProFusion. Photo via EOS
Leading 3D printer manufacturer and service provider EOS, is to debut a new polymer 3D printing technology at Formnext 2018 in Frankfurt next week. This technology, which is reportedly capable of replacing “injection molding in many contexts,” will be presented alongside a demo of Richard Browning’s 3D printed jetpack, and the company’s new quad laser EOS M 300-4 metal system as a production cell. The new developments from the company are made to increase 3D printer outputs to an industrially-competitive scale, a key theme throughout the industry as we saw at last year’s Formnext, and a chief preoccupation for EOS and its partners.

Read the full article here.

FIT AG presents ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ additive manufacturing solution at Formnext

SPOD FIT AG

FIT AG has presented its ‘Spare Parts on Demand’ (SPOD) solution at Formnext which employs additive manufacturing to produce industrial replacement components. As most parts that need replacing have been made with traditional methods, they have often passed through an approval process, meaning it isn’t possible to create a 3D printed copy. Deutsche Bahn, a German railway company, encountered this problem when attempting to replace the left sandbox housing in a brake system. The component had been manufactured in cast grey iron, and so the part had to be redesigned and then printed in titanium using EBM. The printed part has so far passed on all tests performed. At Formnext, FIT AG has showcased SPOD as a way for this success to be achieved with more regularity.

Read more here.

Nanoscribe awarded €40K prize, showcases microscale printing at Formnext
Tess Boissonneault

nanoscribe microscale

Nanoscribe, a specialist in microscale additive manufacturing, was recently selected as the first place winner of the Baden-Württemberg State Prize for Young Companies. The award, worth €40,000, is bestowed upon companies that demonstrate economic success and make a sustainable contribution to society in some way. This week, Nanoscribe has been showcasing its technology at Formnext in Frankfurt. There, the company is exhibiting the fabrication of structures with micrometer precision in millimeter dimensions for the first time.

Read the full article here.

 

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AM is moving transportation beyond traditional supply chains (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 37)

Transportation is victim to many of the issues plaguing many other industries: manufacturing lines are linear and dull and spare parts are manufactured in bulks. 3D printing is not only giving it tools to make many of these steps more efficient, it is also allowing startups to disruption the industry. Which do you think will be more impactful? Startups pursuing new business models or established companies using AM to fine tune theirs?

Siemens To Bring 3D Printed Parts To Dubai Metro

To keep trains running, and passengers happy, [Dubai’s] Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) has signed an MOU with the Middle Eastern branch of award-winning automation conglomerate Siemens. The agreement will enhance the RTA’s existing 3D printed spare parts initiative, contributing to the endeavor to become “the world’s smartest city” by the year 2020.

“The 3D printing technology would enable RTA to keep the Dubai metro assets in service longer while driving down the cost of parts and in turn passing this saving back to the customer.” – Abdul Mohsin Ibrahim Younes, CEO of RTA’s Rail Agency.

Read the full article here.

Daimler Starts 3D Printing Metal Replacement Parts for Older Mercedes-Benz Trucks

Daimler 3D-printed truck parts

Daimler has been 3D printing plastic spare parts for older commercial trucks for about a year, and now it’s moving on to metal parts. The company recently 3D printed its first metal replacement part, a thermostat cover for older Mercedes trucks and Unimog utility vehicles. Daimler believes 3D printing could be a cost-effective way to keep spare parts available indefinitely.

Read all about it at Digital Trends.

How an Autonomous Vehicle Maker Slashed the Supply Chain with 3D Printing

Visualising Olli on MakerBot print/image via MakerBot

A new case study shows how Local Motors, an autonomous and open source vehicle manufacturer, is using 3D printing to save time and money. This case study produced by MakerBot clearly illustrates some of the primary advantages of using 3D printing in a production setting. Firstly, tooling costs at Local Motors are down by a half as 3D printing is used to create to custom tooling for low volume production. Secondly, obtaining the necessary tools quickly can greatly reduce the production time. Thirdly, the tools that are 3D printed and used are optimised for their particular project improving both workflow and the durability of the tools.

Read the full article here.

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AM as a Force for Good (Authentise Weekly 3D News Review – Week 48)

Hello everyone, this is another edition of the Week-in-Review, brought to you by Authentise!

This holiday season it’s becoming clearer than ever that additive is a force for good, helping us face many of our biggest challenges. The Nepal natural disaster response is shifting gears and starting to employ AM in the reconstruction efforts. Audi is partnering with Part-Time Scientists to participate in the Google Lunar XPRIZE, bringing their AM enabled rover. This shopping season studies are also showing that our “modern” supply chains are not as efficient as we think; local, per-order production driven by AM could be the missing piece.

We’ve got a lot to cover, let’s dig in.

In Nepal, Oxfam earmarks earthquake response funds for 3-D printing

Oxfam is entering a new phase of reconstruction response in Nepal one and a half years after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake devastated much of the Himalayan country. The suite of experimental methods being tried include using repurposed plastic bottles as vital home insulation, 3-D printers to instantly create spare parts in remote rural locations and a handful of mapping mobile apps.

Read more at Devex.

Audi’s lunar rover with 3D-printed parts set to launch next year

Partnering with a space travel group called Part-Time Scientists, Audi have entered the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition. Working together since 2015, the goal is to send the co-developed rover to the moon and complete a set of required tasks. Audi have highlighted 3D printing, specifically, as a particularly helpful technique in the construction of the Lunar Quattro. In this case, the wheels of the rover were made with the aid of 3D printing, reducing down time and saving weight.

Read more at TCT.

‘Free’ Returns Aren’t Free

As those with Black Friday fatigue move to shopping online from the comfort of their homes, they’re attracted not just by deals and promises of free shipping, but also by the increasingly common safety net of free returns. But neither of these services is really free. Much has been written about how much “free” shipping actually costs retailers, and as the ability to return goods at no cost becomes an increasingly normal part of online shopping—particularly during the holidays—that service too is becoming more burdensome for merchants. “The annual retail return rate is around 8% , but can reach up to 30% for e-commerce sales, especially in categories like apparel,” Tobin Moore, the CEO of Optoro, a company that specializes in returns, said in an email.

Read more here.

 

We’ll be back next week for another Week-in-Review!

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