Does the Govt. know how to help advance AM? (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 69)

We see AM being the centrepiece of many govt. grants in recent years, and rightly so. The technology has the potential to boost the industrial capacity of a country, as well as draw the attention of research projects which would prefer the most favorable technological hotspot. So, are countries doing enough to spur innovation within their confines? What are the best practices to nourish the industry and its development? The key drivers are education, industry and resources. In this respect, finding ways to fill the current skill gap is crucial for the long-term establishment of AM within a country. For example, the UK has been developing wide-ranging curricula for AM through state-funded collaborations. At the same time, the industry needs time and resources to develop the know-how necessary, and this can come through government-backed research centers (see the US’s ORNL or UK’s NCAM) as well as distributing grants, like the Australian BioMedTech Horizons program.

UK’s First AM Apprenticeship Launching This September

The Manufacturing Technology Centre. Photo via MTC.
This September, the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), based in the UK, will launch what are described as the UK’s first additive manufacturing apprenticeships, with the goal of addressing skills shortages within the industry.

The MTC houses the UK’s National Centre for Additive Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM develops industry ready additive manufacturing processes. It also addresses barriers to the adoption of additive technologies, and legislative and standardisation issues facing the industry.

Read the full article here.

Russia’s $2.6B Jet Engine To Be Made Using AM

ODK-Saturn workshop. Photo via United Engine Corporation

The Aviadvigatel PD-35 is Russia’s next-generation airline jet engine. With a projected budget of 160 billion rubles ($2.6 billion) development of the engine is expected for completion in the next 5 years, and additive manufacturing (or additive technology) is tipped to be an important part of the plan.

For the engine’s development, Russian commercial aircraft developer and builder Aviadvigatel is working with gas turbine manufacturer ODK-Saturn – a company home to the state-funded Additive Technology Center.

Read the rest at 3D Printing Industry.

3D Printing BioPen Receives Investment from Australian Government

In 2016, researchers at the University of Wollongong partnered with orthopedic surgeons at St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne to develop the BioPen, a bioprinting pen that allows surgeons to draw new cartilage directly into a patient’s body during surgery. The BioPen project is one of 11 recipients of a $10 million grant announced by the Australian Federal Government. The grant is part of the government’s $35 million BioMedTech Horizons program, which aims to help move more Australian ideas and discoveries toward proof-of-concept and commercialization, as well as stimulating collaboration between the research, industry and technology sectors.

Read the full article here.

 

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We are going to be present at this year’s Rapid + TCT show from the 23rd to 26th of April in Fort Worth, Texasrapid-tct-logo.

 

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Week in Review: October 18th to 24th – Standardization

Here we go again, another week in review for our wonderful following (and newcomers!).

This week is all about standardization: AM standards, legal conundrums and a plea for IIoT to get over the myths that have held it back, such as the need for standardization. Airbus has made ULTEM™ 9085 the standard material for components of its A350 XWB aircraft, bolstering a $15 billion material supply contract with Hexcel Corp. In the mean time, 3D printing’s rising potential to disrupt industrial manufacturing is being analyzed with a series of questions that pose product liabilty under a new light.

Let’s have a deeper look.

$15 billion Boost to 3D Printing Companies from Airbus Contract

Airbus have just announced it is standardizing on ULTEM™ 9085 3D printing material for use in the A350 XWB. OPM partners Hexcel Corp were also included in the Airbus announcement with the news of an update to their $15 billion supply contract. Hexcel make a range of advanced materials including composites for aerospace. ULTEM™ 9085 is a high-performance thermoplastic, offering similar possibilities to PEKK.

Read more about it at 3D Printing Industry.

Products Liability in the Digital Age: Legal Issues Generated by Additive Manufacturing

Although products liability laws are slightly different from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, new legal questions are beginning to arise with the advent of additive manufacturing. In the AM context, for the first time courts will need to address the seemingly obvious threshold questions of “What is the Product?” and “Who is the Manufacturer?”. AM also raises interesting questions concerning what specific theories of liability may be available to plaintiffs alleging injury from 3D-printed products.

Read the full article at Inside Counsel.

Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

Image for Busting 3 Industrial Internet of Things myths

Unlike consumer markets where standardization, formal or by market dominance, is key to success, for IIoT standardization won’t be a concern for decades. For industries wishing to pursue IIoT it is just to accept that for the foreseeable future there won’t be any standards on how to connect up all their things.

Check out this and two other major IIoT myths at Information Age.

 

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