AM’s Symbiotic Relationship with Light Studies (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 09)

Hi everyone, and welcome to this week’s edition of Authentise News-In-Review!

This week we take a moment to marvel at the wonderfully symbiotic relationship between AM technologies and the study of light, or photonics. AM research is enabling scientists to work with entirely new materials with properties that are offering new ways to interact with nature and study our world. In exchange, our refined knowledge of photonics, empowered by this lengthened list of tools at our disposal, is fueling innovation within AM  technologies, pushing them to work faster, more reliably and accurately than before.

Here’s to light. Let’s dive in.

This Super-Fast 3-D Printer Is Powered by Holograms

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[…] The basic principle here is an established 3D printing technique that uses lasers to cure a light-activated monomer into solid plastic. But unlike other approaches, which scan a laser back and forth to create shapes one layer at a time, this system does it all at once using a 3D light field—in other words, a hologram. It could make 3D printing far faster. The advantage of Daqri’s [a startup that designs and builds augmented-reality devices out of laboratories in San Francisco and in Milton Keynes, U.K.] chip, the company says, is that it can create holograms without the need for complex optics. On a silicon wafer, a tiny grid of tunable crystals is used to control the magnitude and time delay, or phase, of reflected light shined at the surface of the chip from a laser. Software adjusts the crystals to create patterns of interference in the light, resulting in a three-dimensional light field.

Read the full article at Technology Review.

3D printed ceramic “butterfly wings” add color to photonic research

The iridescent wings of butterfly. Photo by Kathleen Dagostino, kathleencavalaro on Flickr

In a paper published in Nature Communications, physicists demonstrate the ability to reproduce the reflective structure of a butterfly wing through 3D printed gyroids. The discovery was made through the study of photonics – how light moves through space and objects – and has resulted in the patenting of a new material. […] Through a 3D printed gyroid, the researchers at Surrey and San Francisco demonstrate an ability to manipulate the photonic band gap through the shape of their ceramic object.

Read the full article here.

3D printing meets lasers in latest stem cell research

Stem cells can be used to build a brain tumour, which could help us beat it.

New research from Vilnius University in Lithuania combines laser writing and 3D printing to create more efficient micro-structures for the culture of stem cells. With computer aided design, biologists can specify structures that will allow cells to grow in a particular way, i.e. to form the pore-structure of the skin, or the cylindrical tissue of a vein. As to be expected, getting the right shape and form is a delicate process. The research from Vilnius University adds laser precision to such 3D microfabrication.

Read the full article here.

 

As a bonus article, here is our CEO Andre Wegner talking about the cloud, IIoT and the need for IT and OT to communicate.

Authentise CEO Bears Witness to OT, IT Folks Playing Nice in Cloud

 

Analytics is just the beginning of the IoT journey for manufacturers. There are already positive examples of machine control via the cloud. Authentise CEO Andre Wegner delivered that glimmer of hope tonight to more than a handful of people gathered around one of several topic tables at the Hard Rock Hotel in San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter, the venue chosen to kick off Industry of Things World USA 2017. […] Authentise provides systems “to customers who are comfortable with a managed cloud, as well as those who are deciding to host it on premise,” he said. “We do what the customer wants, and are seeing about an even split in public cloud adoption. That’s probably more than most since industrial 3D printing is a new market and devices are most often already connected.”

Read the full article here.

 

This is it for this week’s edition, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to come back next week for another fill on the week’s juiciest AM news.

Enabling Research Through AM (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 01)

Hi everyone, welcome back to the new year with a more weekly 3D printing news from Authentise!

Through AM scientists are able to go where traditional manufacturing simply couldn’t take them. NASA is keeping up the pace for the entirely 3D printed rocket by testing more and more components up for the challenge, ROSCOSMOS is planning to add a bioprinter to the ISS’s arsenal and test it at microgravity and, while we’re at it, stem cell research is getting a boost from 3D printing’s ability to create cartilage’s structures.

Are you aching for your daily fix of science with a side of AM? Let’s dig in.

NASA Engineers Test Combustion Chamber to Advance 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Design

Recent tests of a developmental rocket engine at NASA‘s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, produced all the performance data engineers were hoping for, along with the traditional fire and roar. But this engine is anything but traditional. Marshall engineers are designing each of the components from scratch to ultimately be made entirely by AM methods …The series of 12 test firings in late fall brought them a big step closer to that goal, said Andrew Hanks, test lead for the project. The fuel turbopump, fuel injector, valves and other major engine components used in the tests were 3D printed, with the exception of the main combustion chamber.

Read more of these test firings at NASA.

 

Russian space agency Roscosmos to 3D print living tissue on ISS

Russian scientists are planning to install and operate a 3D bioprinter aboard the ISS, according to an official source. They believe that microgravity conditions could actually improve the bioprinting process. […] They believe that significant progress in bioprinting can be achieved by placing equipment in microgravity conditions, since the lack of gravity could potentially help to keep deposited cells in place.

Read the full article here.

Scientists Are Creating New Ears With 3D-Printing and Human Stem Cells

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Inspired by the earmouse, doctors at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Regenerative Medicine have perfected a new technique to grow a fully formed human ear, using patients’ own stem cells. They begin with a 3D printed polymer mold of an ear, which is then implanted with stem cells drawn from fat. As these stem cells differentiate into cartilage, the polymer scaffold degrades, leaving a full “ear” made of mature cartilage cells. The new approach could “change all aspects of surgical care,” says Dr. Ken Stewart, one of the researchers and a plastic surgeon at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children.

Read the whole article at Smithsonian.

 

More next week