Impact & Advance of Machine Vision (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 20)

The industrial world has gained, in the past years, thousands of new eyes and ears thanks to sensors and cameras capable of delivering useful data. The added information capacity allows automation to take hold on tasks with higher degrees of complexity. At the same time it is enabling procedures and operations which not only provide innovative ways to achieve certain objectives but also to save time and money in the process. Metrology instrumentation is becoming more accessible than ever, making custom prosthetics a more feasible prospective for medical institutions. Similarly, medical scans allow doctors to drastically cut pre-operation planning and surgical time, resulting in hefty savings. Lastly, machine vision and inspection is bringing a new era of food handling from farms, improving the process’ quality and ultimately the customer experience.

Nikon Metrology inspection technology and additive manufacturing advance patient-specific implants

A Lithuanian medical company has leveraged Nikon Metrology inspection equipment to advance the production of jaw implants. Ortho Baltic, is one of only three manufacturers of patient-specific temporomandibular joint endoprostheses in Europe. In 2012, Ortho Baltic made an investment into additive manufacturing technology, and more recently the company acquired computed tomography (CT) inspection equipment for quality control from Nikon Metrology. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most used joints in the human body, allowing humans to talk and chew. When this joint is damaged, whether it be by trauma or illness, and typical treatment methods have been ineffective, replacement surgery is required. Patient-specific implants are usually reserved for more severe cases, but Ortho Baltic wants to make the administering of tailored endoprostheses the norm.

Read more here.

3D printing helps Queen Elizabeth Hospital reduce surgical planning time by 93%

By using a Stratasys Objet Eden350V 3D Printer, Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, UK are saving three to four hours in surgical time per surgery, and costs are reduced by up to £20,000 per operation. The hospital had previously outsourced its 3D printing requirements and have now installed an in-house 3D printer to facilitate life-changing maxillofacial surgeries. According to Stratasys 3D printing has, “revolutionized pre-surgical procedures across a number of departments. This includes the maxillofacial (face and jaw); burns and plastics; ear, nose and throat; and neurosurgery units.”

Read more here.

How Robotic Automation Will Benefit Food and Agriculture

Automation technology is now spilling out of industries such as automotive and electronics and into food and agriculture – and it couldn’t be too soon. Jack Uhl, sales manager – CPG (Consumer Products Group) for Yaskawa America, Inc.’s Motoman Robotics Division recently wrote a compelling blog post outlining how “food just got faster.” In the post, Uhl makes an analogy to the wheel that is the food industry and how automation must become the rim tying the spokes together.

Read the full article at Engineering.

 

As always, don’t forget to check out our Twitter profile for more news and come back next week for another edition of the News-In-Review!

Redifining Medical Customizability (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 07)

Hi all and welcome to week 6 of Authentise News-In-Review!

This week we are going to talk about customization for medical applications. AM’s freedom of design makes this one of technology’s core benefits, but nowhere is this more true than in the medical arena. We’ve long heard about custom prosthetics but it can go much further than that. Personalized medicine is taking giant steps to practicality thanks to AM and new “bioinks” are enabling new treatments that could mould to specific patients’ scenarios, like dodging intolerances or adding particular vitamin supplements. Laboratories can study diseases in custom made samples thanks to 3D printing’s power to change design, physical properties and materials on the designer’s whim.

Let’s dive in.

A new 3D bioink for PolyJet 3D printed pills

Researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) have developed a viable bioink for 3D printed pills.  In this study, Giovanny Acosta-Vélez, Chase Linsley, Madison Craig and Benjamin Wu favour the inkjet technique over other 3D printing technologies for its speed and ability to print at room temperature. The temperate environment ensures that active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) aren’t damaged in the process, and speed is of course preferable for mass production. The 3D printable bioink from UCL is made from hyaluronic acid – a key ingredient in skin, connective tissues and the nervous system. A photoinitator is added to the acid so that it solidifies when in contact with light. This mixture is used to fill preformed tablets displaying the properties of an atypical oral tablet.

Read the full article here.

Porous 3D printed scaffolds help Rice University scientists tackle bone cancer

Scientists at Rice University in Houston have used 3D printing to create porous, bone-like scaffolds that can be used to study bone cancer tumors. They found that the size and orientation of individual pores affected how cells proliferate in the absence of blood. According to bioengineer Antonios Mikos, the 3D printed polymer bone scaffold contains artificial pores that constrain the flow of fluid and apply shear stress to tumor cells […] The scientists believe that this model could be vital for finding out more about bone cancer and potential treatments: “We aim to develop tumor models that can capture the complexity of tumors in vitro and can be used for drug testing, thus providing a platform for drug development while reducing the associated cost,” Mikos said.

Read the full article here.

3D Printing the Future of Surgery

One of the most hotly anticipated areas for 3D printing to impact is medicine. A myriad of stories have appeared pointing to all manner of exciting innovations in the medical field. Sadly many of the “3D printed ear/nose/heart/ etc.” stories have been rather disingenuous or are at the very least very optimistic. To give you a more accurate view of the possibilities of 3D printing in medicine we’ll look at one particular area: surgery.

Read how AM is and will transform the surgical world on 3DPrint.

 

As always, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter to receive more news that don’t make the cut to the weekly report and come back next week for another News-In-Review!