The short, and long term planning for AM’s future (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – #111)

3D printing is a technological trend and as with all trends, one should at least try to plan on its future development. So while we’re excited about every new applications, such as the rapid advances the industry is making to make the old traditional tooling industry much more efficient, we’re also excited about the medium term. That includes projects such as houses being 3D printed with biodegradable materials in record times – maybe not immediately relevant but clearly disruptive. Long term though, opportunities are even more disruptive. Our recently approved patent may be a while away from making us money, but importance and disruptive nature of distributed manufacturing is so significant that it’s worth investing every USD to make sure that people collaborate to make it happen. It is a stepping stone for a future infrastructure for production scale AM, one that’s made of building blocks yet to come. We are proud to give our work for the betterment of the industry as a whole, and excited to bring this vision to fruition along with other teams equally as hungry for innovation.

3D printed tool cuts through titanium, wins innovation prize

PhD candidate Jimmy Toton from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, has won the 2019 Young Defence Innovator Award and $15,000 prize at the Avalon International Airshow for the research, which was conducted with Defence Materials Technology Centre (DMTC) and industry partner Sutton Tools.

“Now that we’ve shown what’s possible, the full potential of 3D printing can start being applied to this industry, where it could improve productivity and tool life while reducing cost,” Toton said.

Read the full article here.

 

3D-printed Gaia house is made from biodegradable materials

Gaia is a 3D-printed house by WASP made from biodegradable materials

Italian 3D-printing technology developer WASP, built the house to showcase the abilities of Crane Wasp, a modular 3D-printer that can create homes in a variety of formats and sizes. Called Gaia, the 30-square-metre house has a 3D-printed outer shell and internal timber beams holding a timber roof. It was printed on site in Massa Lombardo, a town in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, in October 2018.

Read the full article at Dezeen.

 

The Real Value Of 3D Printing Patents

[Image: Pexels]

Because patents are a business reality, filing one is a business decision. So when Authentise this week announced the approval of a new patent — for its “System, Method and Program Product for Digital Production Management” — the initial assumption was easy: they’ve decided to protect their IP. That’s not the whole case, though. Andre Wegner, Authentise’s Founder and CEO, confesses that as a rule he doesn’t “care much for patents.” So why file one?

It is ultimately a strategic move, yes, but not one that Authentise really plans for itself. Rather, it’s a move to prove a much larger business case for digital manufacturing.

“In other words,” Wegner explains in a thoughtful LinkedIn piece, “we see this patent as a shining ad to the industry as to where the technology is moving. To get there, we have to work together with others. To work with others, we have to show them there’s value in it. That we think there’s enough value to file a patent.”

Read the full article at Fabbaloo.

 

We are going to exhibit at AMUG! Come visit us at booth #37 from March 31st – April 4th.

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AM delivering Self-Sufficiency @ the Front Lines (Authentise Weekly News-In-Review – Week 36)

Military operations all over the globe are encumbered by grave logistics problems with regards to supplying and maintaining bases, sometimes in remote areas.  3D printing is giving them the ability to utilize local resources for almost anything that’s needed to run the operation smoothly, from the barracks to on-demand repair parts and flexible asset design. The decentralization of the manufacturing capability is a game changer for the military, reducing dependency from external suppliers/producers and providing a more agile toolset to face the challenges of the front.

U.S. Army Seeks Commercialization of 3D Printed Cement Barracks

Cement barracks hut 3D printed at the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory in Champaign, Illinois. Army photo by Mike Jazdyk

Spanning 512 square-feet, the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) in Champaign, Illinois, has revealed the successful construction of its first 3D printed barracks hut.

“ACES provides a capability to print custom designed expeditionary structures on-demand, in the field, using locally available materials.” – Dr. Michael Case, CERL ACES program manager.

Such huts would typically be constructed using plywood. By comparison, locally sourced cements reduces the cost of shipped building materials by half. Automation additionally saves manpower requirements by 62%.

Read the full article at 3D Printing Industry.

Marines Evaluate Mobile Fab Lab To Expedite Repair And Supply

Sgt. Ethan Maeder demos a 3D scanner in the X-FAB. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Kailtin Kelly

The U.S. Marine Corps is evaluating the utility of an expeditionary fabrication laboratory (X-FAB) for on-demand crisis response. A self-contained fab lab, the 20 x 20 foot unit is stocked with four 3D printers, CAD software and a 3D scanner.

It can be deployed with battalion-level Marine maintenance units, servicing support ground equipment including motor transport and communications electronics.

“In a contested environment where ships cannot easily land, or airplanes cannot necessarily fly in and deliver goods, Marines need a way to support themselves—at least temporarily,” – Lt. Col. Howie Marotto, Additive Manufacturing lead at Marine Corps Installations and Logistics.

Read more about the X-FAB here.

US Marine Designs 3D Printed Surveillance Drone at Fraction of Regular Cost

Last year, Rhet McNeal (26-year-old Corporal in the US Marine Corps (USMC)) and a team of five collaborators submitted “Adaptable and Affordable 3D Drones,” a proposal for a transportable, quick-assemble, inexpensive drone that was modeled after the existing Wasp – but with 3D printable parts. An entire Wasp drone system costs roughly $250,000 once all is said and done. But using 3D printer resin, off-the-shelf electronics, and the iPhone app Q Ground Control, the Scout drone system (1 control system, 2 drones) can be built for just $613 – less than 0.5% of the Wasp system.

Read more about the project here.

 

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